What’s story-telling got to do with research?

Vini Landerpost by VINI LANDER
Head of Research, Edge Hill University

The Respecting Children blog has been concerned with linking research evidence to demonstrate how issues of social justice and inequality have recurred over the last forty years.  The generation of empirical data is considered to be one way to support an argument and demonstrate a need for change within education policy or practice.  Researchers working in the field of “race”, ethnicity and education have built up a sizeable range of data to demonstrate how “race” and ethnicity in intersection with other factors such as poverty impact on the educational outcomes of minority ethnic children (Strand 2014), or how ethnicity affects the experiences of Black and minority ethnic trainee teachers in schools (Flintoff 2014; Pearce 2014).  Continue reading What’s story-telling got to do with research?

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Renewing the focus on ‘pushed out’ learners

Sam Baarspost by SAM BAARS
Research Associate, LKMco

Discussions about our education system all too often focus on the largest, most visible components of that system: the attainment of young people in mainstream schools. While debates about educational equity are at the forefront of current policy discourse, with the Pupil Premium explicitly targeting the gap between the attainment of young people receiving Free School Meals (FSM) and their peers, these discussions, too, are framed in terms of the relative performance of young people in mainstream schools. However, more than 20,000 pupils each year receive their education outside the mainstream system, through some form of ‘alternative provision’. Seldom do we turn our attention to these young people who, in Pat Thomson’s words, are “eased out, pushed out and kicked out of school.” Continue reading Renewing the focus on ‘pushed out’ learners

The Role of Ethnicity in Admissions to Russell Group Universities

Steven Jonespost by STEVEN JONES
Senior Lecturer, Manchester Institute of Education, University of Manchester

Here’s an excerpt from a UCAS personal statement written recently by an applicant to a Russell Group university:

There are various times where I have been a team member such as in hockey, this is where we have to understand our team member’s strengths and weaknesses to evaluate best positions, it makes us understand that one’s ability may be skilful but can always be tackled by two. We had to quickly judge aspects; we also understood how goals and motivation can go through team members, as high motivation can motivate another.

Continue reading The Role of Ethnicity in Admissions to Russell Group Universities